risk [Updated October 2003]  

2003 WBC Report     

 2004 Status: pending 2004 GM commitment

Rob Lightburn, VA

2003 Champion

2nd: Frank Easton, ONT

3rd: Robert Paul, AZ

4th: Keith Butler, CA

 5th: Alan Hayes, IL

 6th: Rebecca Hebner, CO

Event History
1999    Rob Lightburn     30
2000    Craig Melton     14
2001    Steve Dickson     29
2002    Phil Rennert     45
2003    Rob Lightburn     33


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 Laurels
Rank Name

From

Last
Total
 1. Rob Lightburn

VA

03
60
 2. Phil Rennert

MD

02
40
 3. Steve Dickson

CA

01
30
 4. Craig Melton

VA

00
30
 5. Robert Paul

AZ

03
24
 6. James Long

PA

02
24
 7. Frank Easton

ONT

03
18
 8. Ken Samuel

VA

01
18
 9. William Place

PA

00
18
10. Tito Lightburn

VA

99
18
11. Alan Hayes

IL

03
18
12. Scott Fenn

MD

02
16
13. Matt Evinger

PA

01
12
14. Marion Hazel

SC

99
12
15. Bill O'Neal

NY

02
11
16. Scott Bowling

IN

01
  9
17. Matt Mason

MD

00
  9
18. Stephane Dorais

QUE

99
  9
19. Keith Butler

CA

03
  9
20. Greg Berry

VA

01
  6
21. John Rinko

VA

00
  6
22.  Rod Morris

MD

99
  6
23. Tom Stokes

NJ

02
  4
24. Rebecca Hebner

CO

03
  3
25. Tom Agostino

CA

01
  3
26. Carl Olson

CT

99
  3

Past Winners

Robert Lightburn - VA
1999

Craig Melton - VA
2000

Steve Dickson - CA
2001

Phil Rennert - MD
2002
     
 


Almost Everyone's First Wargame ...

The Risk tournament consisted of 33 entrants. Returning finalists from previous years were: Scott Fenn, Robert Paul, Alan Hayes, Tom Agustino and Scott Bowling. Returning champions were Steve Dickson and Robert Lightburn. The first Swiss Elimination round consisted of two 6-player, three 5-player and one 4-player; for a total of six games. All players were encouraged to play in both rounds, since one win alone would not guarantee a place in the final game. First round winners were Mark Geary, Alan Hayes, Rebecca Hebner, Ivan Lawson, Rob Lightburn and, Rob Paul. All except Mark Geary played in the second round to improve their chances of reaching the final. Round 2 consisted of two 5-player and two 6-player games. the second round winners were Keith Butler, Frank Easton, Rob Lightburn, and Russell Vane.

The Final game was seeded in order of most wins, final placement in all games, and highest number of opponents personally eliminated from play. Seeding order for the final was as follows: Rob Lightburn was first as the only player with two preliminary round wins; Frank Easton was second seed, with a first and second place finish with four eliminations; third was Rob Paul with a first and second and three eliminations; fourth was Keith Butler with a first and third and four eliminations; Rebecca Hebner was fifth seed with a first and third, and two eliminations with 20 armies and Alan Hayes was the sixth seed with a first and third, and two eliminations with thirty five armies.

Rob L. started the first round of the final by moving a number of his blue forces into Eastern US in order to get a Risk card for capturing a space. Keith B. moved some of his red armies through South America thus establishing control of the continent. Keith purposed a non aggression pack with his North African neighbor, Rob P. who declined the offer. Rebecca captured a territory in Europe to collect her Risk card. Alan follows suit by taking a space in Australia. Rob P. Moves through Africa and establishes the continent. Frank takes a territory in Asia.

In turn 2 Rob L. breaks the South American continent by takingVenezuela from Keith. Unable to take Venezuela back, Keith setles for one territory in Asia for his card. All other players, play cautiously this round, taking one territory to get their card. For turn 3, Rob L. moves through the rest of South America to take the continent. The rest of the players again settle for one territory to get a Card.

To start turn 4, Frank establishes a truce with Alan, both of whom have most of their forces in Asia. Rob L purposes a truce with Rob P. in an effort to hold the South American continent. Rob P. agrees to hold the deal for one turn. Rebecca gains Europe, but only defends it with one army in Iceland. Rob P. breaks through Rebecca's temporary hold of the European continent by taking out a force of six armies in Southern Europe.

Rob L. re-negotiates his Brazilian-North African border treaty with Rob P. for one more turn in turn 5. Keith is the first to turn in a set of cards for four armies, which he places in Eastern US and takes one territory. Rob P cashes in the second set of cards for six armies and decides to try to remove his northern neighbor, Rebecca, since she is now a choice target with five cards. He places his forces in North Africa and removes Rebecca without incident and now holds Europe and six cards. He must turn in a set immediately. He uses the additional forces to reinforce North Africa from the neighboring Rob L in Brazil. On Frank's turn, he takes Western Australia, but purposely stops short of taking the Australian continent, as to not make himself a target.

The negotiators come out in earnest for round 6 as everyone tries to improve their odds of survival. Rob L turns in a set for ten armies, and builds up his forces in Brazil. Rob P is now the one negotiating with Rob L for a one-urn truce on the Brazilian-North African border. Rob L conspires with Alan to attack Rob P. Rob P and Rob L negotiate a treaty with Keith. Rob L not accepting Rob P's proposed treaty, attacks North Africa with success, and moves into Western Europe as well, to deprive Rob P from a potential eight additional armies on his next turn. Alan turns in a set for 12 armies, which he puts in Ural and attempts to attack Rob P in the Ukraine, as per his agreement with Rob L. But alas, Alan forgets to tell his troops (and the dice gods) about the offensive and he loses all but three of his men. Frank now turns in his first set for 15 armies, places them in Western Australia and finally takes the Australian continent.

More negotiations start turn 7 as Rob L reinforces North Africa. Rob L. offers to let Rob P take Europe and let Rob P. hold it, if Rob L. can take Africa and hold it. They agree. Rob L takes the African continent. On Rob Paul's turn, he has a set of cards and turns them in for 20 armies, including the armies he receives for the territories he holds. Rob P now holds Europe strongly with fresh troops on all borders at least 10 strong. Frank turns in a set next for 25 armies, which he places in Indonesia for a full frontal assault to take out Alan and his three cards. Frank takes heavy casualties as Alan's forces whip into shape. But it is too little, too late and Frank finishes Alan off, ending his turn with five cards, meaning that Frank must turn in at the beginning of his next turn. Rob P. proudly announces that everyone now sitting at the table gets wood; and that it really doesn't matter what position he finishes in now, as he has got a prize to show and be proud of.

Turn 8: Rob L negotiates with Rob P. to not attack him for one turn and offers to not turn in a set of cards on his turn for the temporary truce. Rob L makes a reinforcement move to shore up his hold on the African continent. Keith turns in a set for 30 armies. Keith places them in Kamchatka and takes Alaska to get another card. Frank now turns in cards for 35 armies, plays defensively and divides the troops among his Asian possessions while trying to look less inviting.

Will turn 9 turn the tide of war? Rob L. turns in to receive 40 troops. He is really not strong enough with his new forces to take an opponent out and live to tell about it. He decides to discuss with everyone what direction they should go in, in order to avoid a deadlock and determine one winner in the game. The game is at an impasse. A minute or two into the discussion, the GM decides that he is hungry, and asked the remaining players if they like pepperoni on their pizza. After GMing Mamma Mia earlier that day, Keith Levy had pizza on his mind. A pepperoni pizza was ordered. The discussion went on for about 15 minutes or so with everyone debating the best method of game direction and survival.Without announcing his decision, Rob L places all his new armies on the Middle East, takes Afghanistan. and stops there. I couldn't help but laugh. All that talk for this? It was hilarious.

Rob P turns in the next set for 45 armies and decides to eliminate Keith B. who has the fewest forces on the board and is concentrated in the smallest area. Rob P falls miserably short, leaving eight of Keith's forces in Alaska shouting over to Frank, "ah...you really don't want these three extra cards, do you?" To confirm his "consolation prize" Rob P. now announces that he has moved up to at least third place. Frank, of course, walks over to Alaska to finish the job. Frank now has six cards and must turn in immediately. With 50 armies, he places them in Alaska and decides to take out Rob P. Frank shows Rob P how removing an opponent gets done and receives Rob P's two cards as a prize, for a total of five cards. Unfortunately for Frank he used a large portion of his forces to dispose of Rob P.

Now, the only question for the beginning of turn 10 was, does Rob L, having only three cards in his hand, have a matched set to turn in? If he does, the game is likely over. Rob L turns in a matched set of cards for 55 anxious armies and his second RISK championship.

For a dedicated weekend of RISK play, check out the official RISK championships at http://www.risktoc.org

 GM      Keith Levy  [5th Year]   9 Augusta Wood Court, Reisterstown, MD 21136
    GamesClubofMD@comcast.net   NA

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