the napoleonic wars five-player [Updated October2004]  

2004 WBC Report  

 2005 Status: pending 2005 GM commitment

David Gantt, SC

2004 Champion

2nd: John Emery, SC

3rd: Scott Pfeiffer, SC

4th: Josh Githens, SC

5th: Jesse Boomer, KS

6th: Ed Rothenheber, MD

Event History
2003    Forrest Speck     67
2004    David Gantt     64

Waterloo Event History
2003    BruceYoung     24
2004    Scott Moll     14


Offsite links:

AREA Ratings

boardgamegeek

Living Rules:

 Laurels
Rank Name

From

Last
Total
 1.  David Gantt

SC

04
60
 2.  Scott Moll

VA

04
60
 3. Forrest Speck

MD

03
60
 4. Bruce Young

SC

03
50
 5. Bryan Collars

SC

04
38
 6. John Emery

SC

04
36
 7. John Haas

PA

03
36
 8. Jason White

VA

04
24
 9. Scott Pfeiffer

SC

04
24
10. Mark McCandless

CT

03
24
11. Josh Githens

SC

04
18
12. Henry Russell

PA

03
18
13. Charley Hickock

PA

04
17
14. Keith Wixson

NJ

04
16
15. James Eaton

LA

03
15
16. William Burch

MD

04
14
17. Jesse Boomer

KS

04
12
18. George Young

UT

03
12
19. Ed Rothenberger

MD

04
  6
20. Ed Kendricks

UK

03
  6

Past Winners

Forrest Speck, MD
2003
 


There's A Reason It's Called The NAPOLEONIC Wars


French Rule The Multi-Player Tournament

It took four days and 16 games, but now 64 gamers know there is a reason that the great conflict that raged across Europe from1805 to 1815 is called the NAPOLEONIC Wars: it is because the French and the little Corsican who led them were damn hard to beat.

The French won an unprecedented ten of those 16 games -- yet, as in the historical contest, that did not include the last one. First place honors in the multi-player tournament went to Great Britain, which, under the leadership of David Gantt, emerged victorious in the final, championship game.

John Emery proved the power of Prussia by finishing second -- and with five Victory Points was only one point behind Gantt's British, in the finals. Scott Pfeiffer held on to third place with the French (with three VPs). Fourth went to Josh Githens and his break-even Russians. Jesse Boomer may have come in fifth in the five-player final, but he and his Austrians fought hard all the way, holding on tenaciously for four turns before being conquered by the French. Astute readers will note that four of the five finalists are Greenville Mafia regulars. Yep, they came, they saw, and they kicked butt again.

The final was closer than the scores show, as on each of the four turns a different player had a chance to win on a peace die roll. Gantt won on the fourth and last of those rolls, thus ensuring the game did not go into a fifth turn. As there were six plaques for the event, sixth place went to Ed Rothenheber. He did not play in the five-player final, but was a runner-up from the semi-finals.

Of the other 15 games played, all but two had the full five players. The French won ten of those 15. The English and Prussians each won two, and the Russians one. Austria, sadly, did not win a single contest. Such results, it should be noted, are unusual. At both the Waterloo mini-con and the WBC last year, the French were lucky to win a third of the games, and the English, Russians and Austrians split the remainder fairly evenly, with the Prussians picking up a smaller but acceptable share of the rewards.

As Scott Pfeiffer, who gained the only Prussian win of this tourney (in the semi-final round) noted, the French tend to have a better chance in the early heats, which are open to less experienced players. As in the real war, however, the French falter in the semis and final, as they face more experienced, veterans.

In the three games in the semi-final round, for example, the French won only once (John Emery, with an impressive eight VPs). The other two semi-final games went to Scott and his Prussians (who with eight VPs may have a record for points scored by Prussia in this game), and to David Gantt, who took Russia to victory with five VPs at his table.

One of the best things about The Napoleonic Wars game, as the players agree, is that things do not necessarily turn out historical. Some games can be very straight-forward, by the numbers, and others well, can be a little strange and a lot of fun. Some examples, from notes submitted by the players themselves, include:
- the Turkish conquest of Russia
- the elimination of the entire British fleet in a single turn
- the rout of Wellington from Spain and his subsequent death in Lisbon
- the acquisition AND retention of all four minor states by France for an entire game
- six consecutive failures to take Gibraltar by a French army
- the British conquest of Sweden (which had become a Russian ally under Bernadotte
- the defeat and elimination of three British squadrons by a single Spanish squadron
- a French conquest of Russia and
- a pair of back-to-back battles in the same impulse in which 20 Austrian and Russian units were eliminated without the loss of a single French unit.

Of the many comments provided by the players, the designer takes great pleasure in repeating three in particular, each of which speak volumes as to why people keep playing this game.
The first is by John Coussis, who as France in one game wrote "I was down two Keys on turn 1, but came back and won on turn 5 by ONE key."
The second is by Robert Chiasson, who although he did not win on that particular table, wrote that his group played "a roller coaster of a game!"
The third, and perhaps my favorite, comes from Darren Kilfara, who at the end of his semi-final writes that "although I finished in last place, I had a blast!"
In that particular contest Darren, like the man after whom the game and the wars are named, played Napoleon.

While the tournament was in progress, many availed themselves of the chance to check out the Wellington sequel on the big demo board with designer Mark and developer Fred Schachter on hand to give a quick tour of the Peninsular Campaign.

 GM      Mark McLaughlin  [2nd Year]   NA
   mgmprsm@discovernet.net   NA

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