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7 Wonders Duel (7WD) WBC 2017 Report
Updated February 12, 2018 Icon Key
 
70 Players Nick Page 2017 Status 2018 Status History/Laurels
  2017 Champion   Click box for details. Click box for details.
 

YOU’VE GOT TO HAVE A GAME TO PLAY

This was the second year of the 7 Wonders Duel tournament at the WBC. It was the first year for me, as I missed the WBC last year, so I took over an event I had neither GMed nor played in previously. This was, in fact, my first time GMing anything at the WBC. Lessons were learned!

I used the format established by the previous year’s GM: a first round in which everyone was able to play up to four games (that was the intention, anyway), followed by a quarterfinal, taking the top 8 players from the first round, and single elimination matches from there.

Now on to the results:

The initial round attracted 70 players. It’s a good thing I brought my own personal copy, because the total number of games brought by players (including a few players who had two copies), not including mine, was 46!

Because one of the tie-breaking criteria to advance was number of Military/Science victories, the first round saw what I thought was an unusual number of Military/Science victories. There were a total of 126 games. Of these, 35 (28%) ended in Science victories, 20 (16%) in Military victories, and 71 (56%) in civilian victories.

The highest single score for a civilian victory was 98, scored by Antony Saccenti. The lowest winning score was 49. The average winning score among all civilian victories was 68.45, with a median of 68. The greatest gap in scores was 54, won by Pieter Villion in his 82-24 game. Four games were won by a single point, and two ended in ties and were decided by points from blue cards. The average difference in scores was 15.06, with a median difference of 10.

At the end of round one, a total of 17 players had actually completed four games. Most of the rest played three, though a number of people played only two or in some cases one game - either because they arrived late, their games took a long time, or some people dropped out once they’d lost a game or two.

Eight players would advance to the quarterfinals. There were four players with 4-0 records (including young Sam Wolff, who scored two Military and two Science victories. I hope some of the sharks who were seeking easy prey got knocked out by this kid!) From the fourteen players who had 3 wins, I had to select four using the tie-breaking criteria. The quarterfinal matches were:
Dominic Blais vs. Tyson Henning (Winner: Dominic Blais, Science)
Jon Senn vs. Eric Meader (Winner: Jon Senn, Science)
Donte Saccenti vs. Chris Wildes (Winner: Donte Saccenti, 65-63)
Nick Page vs. Sam Wolff (Winner: Nick Page, 50-46)

The four winners then squared off for the semifinals:
Jon Senn vs. Donte Saccenti (Winner: Jon Senn, 76-53)
Nick Page vs. Dominic Blais (Winner: Nick Page, 62-40)

The final match between Jon Senn and Nick Page was a tight one in which both players were carefully counting scores as they went and calculating the cards that might yet be turned over. Jon Senn ended the Second Age with a lead in victory points, forcing Nick to make a critical decision: could he catch up, or should he go all-in for the Science win with the Law Progress Token? He chose the latter, abandoning any chance of beating Jon’s score and instead hoping that the Science card he needed would not escape his grasp. Midway through the Third Age, it happened - a green card was uncovered, and while Jon could take it to keep it out of Nick’s hands, he was unable to prevent Nick from acquiring another Science card in a higher row. Nick Page became the second 7 Wonders Duel champion with a Science victory.

I would like to congratulate the winners, and thank all the players, and encourage you to show up for this popular tournament next year (and be sure to bring a copy of the game!)

 
2017 Laurelists Repeating Laurelists: 0

Jon Senn Dominic Blais Donte Saccenti Sam Wolff Tyson Henning
2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th
 

Sam Wolff beat a lot of players to reach the quarterfinals,
but met his match when he had to play Nick Page.

Jon Senn and Dontie Saccenti in the semifinals.

7 Wonders Duel finalists with GM David Edelstein.

Nick Page is the 2017 7 Wonders Duel Champion.
 
GM     David Edelstein [1st Year]   NA
   david.edelstein@gmail.com    NA